Calacatta Marble Kitchen Countertop

Granite, Quartz & Marble Concepts For Your Home

Leathered, Honed, Volcano Finishes with Granite/Quartz

Posted by Jonathan Wheller on Mon, May 30, 2011 @ 11:28 AM

Over the last few years, many different finishing options have come to market for granite and quartz countertops.  Before these last few years, we had only been able to see Granite and Quartz in polished finishes. Now that the industry has grown and quartz and granite are hugely popular in modern design, we are beginning to see a variety of available finishes for stone countertops. 

 

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Leathered and honed finishes are often related to each other, but do have specific differences between the two.  Honed finishes were first introduced to give stone a softer look compared to that of polished stone.  One of the only problems to consider with using a honed finish is that it can affect the overall performance of the stone when it comes to staining.  Leathered finishes have advanced the honed look to allow for better performance.  Leathering closes the stone pores, which make it much more difficult to stain than a honed finished.  Leathering also retains the natural stone colour while honed finishing tends to cloud out the natural colour of the stone.

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Silestone has been offering quartz countertop colours in a leathered finish for a nearly five years.  Coming very soon, Silestone will introduce a new texture to the market that has not yet been approached:  Volcano.  This new Volcano texture is said to give the feel of an orange peel, while continuing to offer the same performance standards as their leathered and polished finishes.  Silestone expects to release this finish, along with a variety of new and exciting colours this summer. Silestone is able to offer their remarkable 15 year warranty with these new finishes as well.

finished piece leather silestone resized 600

If you are interested in learning more about leathered, honed, or Volcano finishes to your granite or quartz products, please visit Latitude Countertops or speak with one of our knowledgeable and friendly sales team members. 

Topics: Granite, slabs, Silestone, bathroom design, bathroom ideas, Toronto, counter tops, counter tops, Quartz Kitchen Countertops, counter top, Countertops, Countertops, Kitchen Renovation, Quartz, Quartz, Cleaning granite counter top, difference between granite and quartz, kitchen countertop, Kitchen Countertops, Natural Stone, Granite countertops, kitchen design, Granite Kitchen Countertops, Cleaning granite, Granite Kitchen Countertop, Staining, care for Granite, cleaning quartz counter top, unique granite, Granite vs Quartz, Stone, Stone Fabricator, Natural Stone Fabricator

I can’t believe its not granite…or is it?

Posted by Karen Yuen on Tue, May 17, 2011 @ 01:03 PM

Granite and Silestone
I can’t see the difference, can you see the difference?

Ok, enough taglines from old commercials…or is it?

Many people ask me what the difference is between Quartz and Granite counter tops.  And the answer is this:  Granite is natural and mined from the earth.  Quartz counter tops are man made in that quartz is ground up in to a powder, resins and binders added and processed so it’s like a rock. Granite is porous, which allows for liquids and germs to penetrate the surface, and thusly, requires sealing every few years.  Quartz on the other hand is non porous and does not need to be sealed, ever. 

Spills on granite should be wiped up right away and with quartz, it’s ok if you leave it there for a few hours or a couple of days before you clean it, it wouldn’t stain as easily as granite can (I've left red wine on a white quartz and was able to clean it off). Simply clean it with soap and water or a light abrasive cleaner…It’s that easy.  Quartz counter tops really takes a licking and keeps on ticking. Less time cleaning and worrying about your counter top means you have time to do more. 

So why do people still want to get a piece of the rock a.k.a. granite? Because up till now, quartz tended to look too uniform and too, well, man made.  While some people love the uniform look of CaesarStone’s Concrete, Silestone's Grey Expo or Hanstone’s Blanco Canvas, there are still people looking for that unique granite look.  Every piece of granite is unique, you can almost see a moment of earth’s history in a slab of granite, what created that red spot in the stone, or that green swirl? Many different minerals make up a slab of granite and how delicate or strong a particular piece of granite is depends on these minerals.  So care for the granite becomes paramount in maintaining the beauty of the stone. 

Is it possible to combine the look of granite without the maintenance? As you can see from the above pictures, the answer is a resounding “yes”.  Finally, through research and the miracles of science, CaesarStone, Silestone and HanStone are rolling out their uniquely patterned quartz surfaces made to look like granite and are durable like quartz. It’s not nice to fool Mother Nature, but if it means you don’t have to worry about your counter top, then may be it’s worth it.  Quartz durability with the look of granite makes it hard not to love it for life.

(Can you spot the taglines? Put your answers in the comment box)

Topics: Quartz, Quartz, Cleaning granite counter top, difference between granite and quartz, Granite Kitchen Countertops, Cleaning granite, care for Granite, cleaning quartz counter top, Granite vs Quartz

Caring for your Granite or Marble Counter Top

Posted by Karen Yuen on Wed, Jan 12, 2011 @ 02:24 PM

 

Think it's time to show your Granite or Marble counter top the love? 

Here are some simple care and maintenance tips for keeping your Granite or Marble counter top beautiful.

Regularly clean natural stone surfaces with mild detergent or with soap and water.  Thoroughly rinse and dry the surface after washing. Blot up spills immediately to prevent/minimize permanent staining.


DOS AND DON'TS 

DO use coasters under all glassware, particularly those containing alcohol or citrus juices. Many common foods and drinks contain acids that will etch or dull the surface of many stones. 

DO use trivets or mats under hot dishes to prevent thermal shock. 

DO use place mats under china, ceramics, silver or other objects that can scratch the surface. 

DON’T place hot items directly on the stone surface.

DON'T use vinegar, lemon juice or other cleaners containing acids on granite, marble, limestone, travertine or onyx surfaces.

DON'T use abrasive cleaners. 

DON'T mix bleach and ammonia; this combination creates a toxic and lethal gas.

DON'T ever mix chemicals together unless directions specifically instruct you to do so.

Treating Stains

 Blot the spill with a paper towel immediately. Don't wipe the area, it will spread the spill. Flush the area with mild soapy water and rinse several times. Dry the area thoroughly. Repeat as necessary. 


Stain Specific Cleaning

 Oil-based (grease, tar, cooking oil, milk, cosmetics) Clean gently with a soft, liquid cleanser with bleach, household detergent, ammonia, mineral spirits or acetone. 

Paint

 Small amounts can be removed with lacquer thinner or scraped off carefully with a razor blade. Paint strippers can etch the surface of the stone; re-polishing may be necessary. Follow the manufacturer's directions for use of these products, taking care to flush the area thoroughly with clean water. Protect yourself with rubber gloves and eye protection, and work in a well-ventilated area. Use only wood or plastic scrapers for removing the sludge and curdled paint. 

Water Spots and Rings 

Surface markings due to the  accumulation of hard water may be buffed out with dry 0000 steel wool. 

Scratches and Nicks

Slight surface scratches may be buffed with dry 0000 steel wool. Deeper scratches and nicks in the surface of the stone should be repaired and re-polished by a professional. 


This information is found at: www.marble-institute.com

Topics: Cleaning granite, cleaning marble

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